Cognitive Hope

Completed Book CoverAlmost 50 million people worldwide have dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form. My father succumbed to its insidious progression. He passed away July 31, 2006.

Following his death I wrote my book Silver Taps, an attempt to come to grips with his passing and a  reflection on our relationship and the disease. It’s important to recognize that Alzheimer’s affects not only the individual but family members and friends who provide support and also struggle to understand and cope with the loss of a loved one’s cognition (see my previous post Sixth Leading Cause of Death,  dated March 15, 2017.)

As of today there is no cure for the disease, and the number of cases is expected to triple by 2050. Drug trials have shown promise in the past, but up until recently that promise has failed to materialize. The individual affected by the loss of memory knows what is happening but is unable to do anything about it, while caretakers are also faced with the certainty that in spite of their efforts the individual will eventually be unable to do anything on their own and may even forget even their closest relations. Multiple health related complications are common and they almost always result in death.

However, a new discovery provides hope. The drug is not FDA approved and much more testing is required, however, the Center for Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment is encouraged by the initial study. 856 patients from the United States, Europe and Japan were involved in the clinical trial.

For the first time a drug has shown the ability to clear plaque from the brain and actually improve cognition. This is a potential milestone in the efforts to eventually find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

Having experienced the pain of loss of someone who was a pillar of strength within my family before the onset of this disease, I continue to advocate for continued research leading to a cure. “Hope,” in this instance, is the expectation of success in finding a remedy that will impact anyone affected by Alzheimer’s. I can’t change my experience, but I continue to hold onto that hope and encourage others experiencing similar circumstances to be optimistic.