Sixth Leading Cause of Death

When I began this blog a little over a month ago it was with the intent to promote readership of my books and initiate a dialogue on their subject matter. To date I have focused my posts on my historical novel Palo Duro. However, in keeping with the theme that “Life is History,” I found myself reflecting on the passage of over 100 years since Dr. Alois Alzheimer first described the symptoms of cognitive impairment and brain damage, now a recognized disease that bears his name.

There is still no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Today’s drugs mask symptoms but do not treat its underlying cause nor delay its progression. Citing a 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) report some 44 million people currently are affected by the disease. That number is projected to rise to 135 million by the year 2050.

My father was afflicted with Alzheimer’s and my earlier book (a personal memoir)  delves not only into our relationship,  but the terrible effects of dementia and my family’s efforts to understand and cope with his mental deterioration and eventual death.

Alzheimer’s is such an insidious disease. I believe the worst aspect for the individual with the disease, at least at first, is knowing what is happening and being unable to do anything about it. I know the worst aspect for anyone that takes on the responsibility of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, is the certainty that currently there is no cure and no matter what you do the disease is fatal. Drugs and therapy may slow the disease’s progression, but memory will fade  and eventually even family members and friends will become distant and often total strangers. In time the disease will render the individual totally unable to do anything for themselves. The body becomes a shell, and the mind a quagmire of jumbled images and information that if processed at all only results in confusion, anger and despair. – excerpt from Silver Taps.

I encourage anyone with a family member or friend with Alzheimer’s disease to advocate for further research leading to a cure. Even if you are fortunate to not be personally affected at the moment, should the WHO’s projections hold, it is highly likely that you will be sometime in the not too distant future.

 

 

Opening Dialogue

It is rather daunting launching a blog, especially if you’ve never written one before. How do you introduce yourself or your topic? Where do you start?

In 2014 I was diagnosed with Stage IV cancer resulting in treatment often referred to as the trifecta by cancer patients – chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. Needless to say it was a life altering experience that required a reassessment of careers. For twenty-four years I’d worn the uniform of the U.S. Army, for another five I’d been a management director of a computer software company, and following the events on 9/11 I’d served as an independent contractor providing counterintelligence support worldwide. All of these jobs, if not demanding a 24/7 commitment, did require an energy that I no longer possessed. Nonetheless, sitting idle while undergoing treatment was not an option, so to maintain my sanity I turned to writing.

My first book, “Silver Taps,” was published in 2015 by Outskirts Press. It is a personal memoir; a tribute to my alma mater Texas A&M University, and an exploration of my relationship with my father, a veteran of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam who passed away from Alzheimer’s disease. Its positive reception and the enjoyment I found in writing led to my second effort, “Palo Duro,” a historical novel focused on the Indian Wars in the Southern Plains at the end of the nineteenth century. It has just recently been released by Page Publishing.

The two books may seem worlds apart, yet both are connected by the love and respect I had for my father and the love he passed on to me for history and the Old West. Certainly history is not everyone’s cup of tea. Facts, dates, events, and historical figures in and of themselves can be dry sterile material; yet the historical fiction genre allows the writer latitude in bringing a particular historical period and the people involved to life. Similarly, the western may not hold the public’s attention as it once did in cinema or published media, yet it remains a window into our past, the expansion of our borders east to west, and the rugged individualism and entrepreneurship that forged a nation.

Both my books are currently available through retail and digital distributors (OutskirtsPress.com, PagePublishing.com, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon).

As we continue this conversation, I look forward to your feedback, questions, comments, and reviews on either or both.