Sunday, June 14th

In the midst of our national anguish over systemic racism, the coronavirus, and record unemployment our focus has justifiably been on police accountability and reform, the rising numbers of COVID-19 cases, and finding a balance between reopening the economy and the need for social distancing. The Black Lives Matter protests, the pandemic, and financial hardship not seen since the Great Depression are our daily reality, all extensively covered by the media, the subject of conversations between family membersĀ  and friends, as well as factors in our decision making and activities.

We are certainly witnessing a historical confluence of events in this country and throughout the world, yet it is also important for Americans to acknowledge Flag Day and the Army’s 245th birthday. Both occurred yesterday (Sunday, June 14th) yet largely went by without notice or observance.

It was on this day in 1775 that the First Continental Congress authorized enlistment of soldiers to fight the British in what became known as the Continental Army (before the United States was even established as a country.) After the Revolutionary War and our independence, it would be re-designated as the U.S. Army on June 3, 1784.

Also on this day in 1777 the Second Continental Congress officially adopted the Stars and Stripes as our National flag. In 1916 President Woodrow Wilson would recognize the date as Flag Day, but it wouldn’t be until August 3, 1949 that President Harry S. Truman officially established June 14th as a day to pay tribute to this symbol of national unity.

Though this nation is far from united, and we have yet to achieve equal justice under the law for all our citizens regardless of race, I proudly fly the American flag 365 days a year. For me it is a symbol of hope, of what we aspire to be as a nation. It still stands for freedom and embodies the words penned by Thomas Jefferson and contained in our Declaration of Independence… “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I also take great pride in the United States Army as an institution that protects those freedoms. In the oath of enlistment and oath for commissioned officers are the words “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.” It is an oath not taken lightly. Among its many provisions, the Constitution guarantees freedom of speech, the right to peaceably assemble, the right to vote, and the right to petition the government for redress of grievances. I took and upheld this oath during the twenty-four years that I wore the uniform as did the enlisted and officers with whom I had the privilege to serve. I hold them in the highest regard as I do the men and women of today’s Army.

Though Flag Day and the Army’s birthday have passed, Americans are encouraged to fly the flag all this week and it is always appropriate to express appreciation to our veterans and the men and women currently serving in the Armed Forces. Even amidst the uncertainty and turmoil of today some observances are worth our effort.

Finally I pray that in 2020 we also finally acknowledge systemic racism and institute meaningful and long overdue change, that we successfully develop a vaccine to fight and defeat this infectious disease, and that we return to economic prosperity not for just for the few, but for everyone.